With fond memories of Portland's premiere KICK-ASS radio station - 1972 to 1974
(and then a couple more years without the kick-ass)

 


KQIV 106.7 FM - Lake Oswego, Oregon - KQ4 Rockin' in Quad

Contact us:  kq4.lake.oswego at gmail dot com

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Retired  Webmaster

      Larry Scott       KQ4 Jock / Sometime
Music Director

 

Webmaster

    J. R. Miller     KQ4
Chief Engineer / Jock 













































































































































































































































































































 PAGE LINKS
[HOME PAGE]
[ARTWORK]
[RESTORED ARTWORK]
[PROMOTION]
[STAFF PIX]
[MORE STAFF PIX]
[STAFF MEMORIES]
[WHERE ARE THEY]
[REUNIONS]
[IN MEMORY OF...]
[AIRCHEX]
[LISTENER MEMORIES]
[CONCERTS]
[SPECIAL PROGRAMS]
[ADVERTISERS]
[EARLY PRESS]
[MIDDLE YEARS PRESS]
[PRESS @ THE END]
[PRESS ABOUT THE SITE]
[EUROPE RADIO TOUR]
[FCC PAPERWORK]
[THE STUDIOS]
[XMITTER & TOWER]
[RATINGS]
[RATE CARDS]
[STATION-ERY]
[LOGS]
[CH 294 CHRONOLOGY]
[RECEIVERSHIP SALE]

[BLOG POSTS]

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Web www.rockininquad.com

POSTS FROM THE BLOG

Friday, October 2, 2009

PIONEER MIKES

Every fan of Oregon's broadcasting past will want a copy of this new book:
"Pioneer Mikes" A History of Radio and Television in Oregon

posted by J. R. Miller

Saturday, May 2, 2009

PORTLAND, OREGON HISTORY

If you're like me and love Portland, Oregon area history, you'll enjoy the blog Dan Haneckow presides over at Cafe Unknown! He includes links to several more excellent sites, too.

posted by J. R. Miller

Monday, November 20, 2006

"THE HITS BETWEEN THE HITS"

I've been enjoying a book that will be of interest to fellow radio historians:
"The Hits Between The Hits: The History of Radio ID Jingles"

posted by J. R. Miller

Wednesday, June 7, 2006

BEN MARSH, 1943-2006

With much sadness came recent news of the passing of Bruce Benjamin Marsh on April 5, 2006, in Coeur d'Alene, Idaho. After over 30 years, I still can recall his deep, unique voice.

Ben Marsh was born and raised in Scobey, Montana, and graduated from Scobey High School in 1961. He began his radio journey as "Benny Most" in the early 1960's while attending college in Portland, Oregon. Ben went on to KYLT in Missoula, Montana, serving as Program Director and afternoon announcer. He moved to KVNI in Coeur d'Alene in 1964, and in 1966 to KGVO in Missoula as Program Director. Ben was twice named "Montana Broadcaster of the Year." In 1970, "Benny Marsh" landed at KYXI AM-1520 in Oregon City, Oregon, as a news anchor and reporter.

Early in 1972, I was excited to learn that Ben would be bringing his wonderful voice to Lake Oswego, joining us in putting the new KQIV FM-106.7 on the air. Ben served as News Director, and later as Program Director and disk jockey. Unfortunately for us, Ben returned to KYXI in 1973.

In 1974, Ben got married and soon left the radio business forever. He moved to the woods of northern Idaho where he and his wife, Judy, raised their two sons. Judy continues to live in the log house Ben built.

Before starting his own weed spraying business, Ben was the weed superintendent of Benewah County and an avid Hawkweed fighter. Current events were a fascination for Ben and he loved a lively discussion. His knowledge of many subjects made him a library of information. He also enjoyed singing bass in a barbershop quartet.

Many thanks to Judy Marsh and Ernie Hopseker for sharing their remembrances of Ben. He surely will be missed.

********************
June 13, 2006

Nice of you to take the time to write about Ben. Though he left the business behind, Ben's love of broadcasting always remained with him.

He turned on the news channel as soon as he got up and it stayed there all day if he had his say, which he did most of the time! He always was watching the technical side of things and bemoaned the pitiful use of language and the "editorializing" they sometimes call news reporting these days.

Ben would have enjoyed being back in touch with friends from those days. Some of his fondest memories came from those times and those friends.

Things are going well for us and we thank you for your kind memoriam. Carry on!

Judy Marsh

********************
June 14, 2006

Sometimes it seems like the brief appearance of KQIV embedded itself like James Dean, Janis and Jimmy. Such a momentary flash that lingers on because of the depth of its impact on our lives.

Ben Marsh is one more reason this little station, which never really made it out of infancy, caused such a lasting impression. I believe it will stand out as a benchmark that raised the bar because the concept, and the people who carried it forth, were one in the same.

This indistinguishable union defines the magic that shone so brightly for a moment, and will be remembered by those who were there --- forever.

Norman Ellis-Flint

posted by J. R. Miller

Friday, March 31, 2006

WHAT A TEAM!

I received an e-mail from Steve Lloid at the new K-Hits 106.7 in which he marveled at the number of pros who worked for KQIV during its first couple of years on the air.

Yes, the list is quite impressive and includes: Glen Adams, Bob Ancheta, Jeff Clarke, Joe Collins, Norman Flint, Ed Hepp, Dick Jenkins, Gloria Johnson, Jim LaFawn, Faith Landreth, Ben Marsh, Steve O'Shea, Jim Robinson, Mike Sakellarides, Larry Scott and Steve Shannon.

Some of them are still in the business while others have followed different paths. And, unfortunately, a few of our friends are no longer with us. Looking back, we had quite a team in the early 1970's!

posted by J. R. Miller

Monday, February 27, 2006

QUEST FOR A CALL SIGN

There were ongoing discussions beginning in the fall of 1971 about what call letters should be requested for the new station. Owner Walter Kraus had originally envisioned catering to the well-heeled Lake Oswego crowd by providing them with classical music, opera performances, and news.

Another interesting Kraus idea was the "Ivy Club," a take-off on the Ivy League and its social prestige. Ivy Club members would pay a fee to receive commercial-free classical music on a station-provided subcarrier receiver. A suggested call sign at that point was KIVC.

Soon thereafter, as the proposed format changed from classical to Progressive Rock and the possible use of discrete Quadraphonic audio was added to the mix, more call letter ideas emerged. Questions also arose about the feasibility of a rock station providing classical music on a subcarrier, so it was decided to abandon the Ivy Club idea for the time being.

However, with the emergence of the Quad concept, the "IV" would now stand for "4." One favorite call sign suggested was KIVQ (K4Q). It was pointed out that it might be offensive to some if the station became known as "Fork You." The eccentric Walter Kraus and other staffers loved that one, but were soon talked out of it.

After several discussions and a vote, we applied for a call sign that captured the true spirit of the station. The winner was KQIV (KQ4) which the FCC granted us on December 27, 1971.

posted by J. R. Miller

Sunday, February 26, 2006

DORREN QUADRAPLEX: THE LONG WAIT

In the fall of 1971, Willamette Broadcasting Company owner Walter Kraus and key staff members met with James Gabbert of KIOI (K-101) in San Francisco and returned to Lake Oswego very excited. K-101 had successfully transmitted true four-channel audio for the first time on a single FM station using Dorren Quadraplex, a process invented by Louis "Lou" Dorren. The FCC was concerned, however, with certain technical issues that had to be resolved before it would give Quadraplex its blessing.

KQIV had hoped to be the Portland-area station chosen to participate in a long-term, multi-market field test of Quadraplex. In anticipation that full-scale testing would be approved by the FCC, Willamette Broadcasting went forward and blanketed the area with outdoor billboards proclaiming, "Credibility is back. KQ4 Quadraphonic FM 107."

Then, about a month before KQ4's on-air debut, the FCC issued the following:

792
Federal Communications Commission Reports

BEFORE THE FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION
WASHINGTON, D.C. 20554

Discrete Four-Channel Multiplex Transmissions
Report No. 10851
August 9, 1972

THE COMMISSION ISSUED THE FOLLOWING PUBLIC NOTICE:

Broadcast Action

Discrete Four-Channel Multiplex Stereo Transmission Requires Specific Authority, FCC Rules

FM broadcast stations may not engage in discrete four-channel multiplex transmission without specific authorization, the Commission has ruled.

Pacific FM, Incorporated, licensee of FM station KIOI, San Francisco, Calif., asked for the Commission ruling. Pacific FM had previously obtained temporary experimental authority to field test the Dorren Quadraplex System. It contended that the Dorren system was compatible with present rules governing two-channel stereo and that music transmitted by this method could be offered to the public without further authorization.

The Commission said that the four-channel stereo systems being sold today are "pseudo-enhancement devices relying on a phase-differential principle to achieve four-channel audio effects," and may be used within the FCC's present FM stereo transmission standards without specific authorization.

The Commission cautioned, however, that these "pseudo systems" should not be confused with discrete four-channel multiplex transmission, like the Dorren system, which has been authorized only on a limited experimental basis. Section 73.322(c) of the rules permits the transmission of only a single sine subcarrier, where the Dorren system requires the addition of a cosine subcarrier, the FCC noted. The Commission also indicated that, since the Dorren system might exceed present limits on modulation, existing protection ratios for co-channel and adjacent channel stations would have to be reviewed before the system could come into general use.

Action by the Commission August 9, 1972, by letter. Commissioners Robert E. Lee (Acting Chairman), H. Rex Lee and Wiley, acting as a Board.

72 F.C.C. 2d
----------
On August 1, 2007, I received this from Lou Dorren: "We actually won as the US national standard. It took the FCC so long to approve (March of 1986) that the industry was already dead!"

posted by J. R. Miller

Monday, June 13, 2005

CURSE OF THE BLACK ROSES?

Well before KQIV went on the air, and while a classical music format was still in the works, veteran Portland broadcaster, John Lewis, was hired as general manager by the station's owner, Walter Kraus.

Eventually, the decision was made to dump the music of the old masters and to program KQIV as a progressive rock station. Lewis was dismissed.

When I arrived at work one morning shortly thereafter, I noticed on the front desk an unusual bouquet of a dozen black roses. The card read, "Thanks for nothing, Walter" and it was signed, "John."

Had I just seen an ominous sign for KQIV's future?

posted by J. R. Miller

Tuesday, May 17, 2005

MORE ROCKIN' KUDOS

"After poking around...for a very quick three and one-half hours...
I was purely amazed."
- Fox Blackwood

"I must say, this website is incredible."
- Greg Kirkpatrick

posted by J. R. Miller

Thursday, January 6, 2005

NATIONAL LAMPOON RADIO HOUR

THE NATIONAL LAMPOON RADIO HOUR.....Memories from Larry Scott

The National Lampoon Radio Hour ran from November 17, 1973 to December 28, 1974, and was broadcast weekly on hundreds of stations.

It introduced many talented and now well-known performers to a national audience for the first time. Among the performers that appeared regularly or irregularly were Chevy Chase, John Belushi, Christopher Guest, Michael O'Donoghue, Bill Murray, Brian Doyle-Murray, Gilda Radner, Harry Shearer, Harold Ramis, Joe Flaherty, Richard Belzer, Tony Scheuren, Windy Craig, Flo & Eddie, George Coe, Gary Goodrow, Norman Rose, and Alice Playten, just to name a few.

KQ4 immediately grabbed the contract for Portland. KINK tried to get the contract but my remembrance of the situation was the National Lampoon people felt their show wouldn't work on a soft-rock station. KQ4 was the only "heavy" progressive album station in town and the show was a perfect fit.

The NLRH was hysterically funny and extremely rude at the same time...as only the aforementioned group of crazies could produce. Almost all of the NLRH crew went on to Saturday Night Live.
----------
The Christmas show in 1973 was a perfect example of the "something to offend everyone" mentality that was the hallmark of the show.

The show began with a reporter on a jumbo jet with hundreds of orphaned children that had been rescued from a third world country. They were being taken to the United States for Christmas and then a new life with adoptive families. But...the jet was hijacked by terrorists who demanded a ransom for the children. This bit segued in and out of the entire hour...each new take an update on the hostage situation that was not going well as no one would pay the ransom. So...at the very end...you guessed it...the show ended with a terrible explosion as the terrorists blew up the plane. Merry Christmas!
----------
There was the Cocaine Etiquette Guide...advice on nose candy. QUESTION: If offered cocaine at a party, is it polite to refuse? ANSWER: We don't know. No one ever has.
----------
But the best bit of all happened in February and March of 1974. The NLRH was a full hour for the first 13 weeks. But, it was difficult to produce an hour of really great comedy every week so the producers decided to cut the show to a half-hour. They sent a letter to the stations explaining their decision.

I did 8pm-midnight, Monday to Saturday, so I was at the controls when the NLRH aired at 8pm on Saturday night. On week #14, sure enough, the tape was a small 30-minute reel. I cued it up and aired it as usual. After the last spot break, at about 28 minutes into the show, they begin a bit. I was getting worried because I couldn't figure out how they could finish the bit by the end of the show. They didn't finish the bit. The tape ran out right in the middle of the bit...and I was left with a few seconds of dead air as I grabbed the mike and started talking.

I explained the situation to the listeners. All this while the phones were ringing off the hook. I explained about it being just 30-minutes and, obviously, that we had fallen victim to a NLRH prank. I got back to the music and answered the phones...for over TWO HOURS. No one believed me. They all thought I had screwed it up and cut the show. Actually, I thought it was very funny...except I had to try to calm down all the angry listeners.

The next week, when the NLRH tape arrived in the mail, there was a letter of explanation basically saying "Ha, Ha, we got you," and thanking us for being good sports. I believed it. I should have previewed the end of the show, but I didn't.

That Saturday night I aired the NLRH as usual with an explanation at the beginning that it was now just a 30-minute show. After the last spot break, Chevy Chase introduced himself and said (paraphrasing here), "Hello. I'm Chevy Chase. It has come to our attention here at the National Lampoon Radio Hour that many stations around the country refused to air the last half-hour of last week's show. Evidently they felt the content was too provocative. I must remind you, this IS a one-hour radio program. It is a full 60 minutes in length. If your radio station is just playing the first half-hour, please call the station immediately and register your complaint. Thank you." They went into a bit and the tape ran out!

All HELL broke loose!!! The phones were still going when I got off the air at midnight. And were the listeners angry. I explained, on the air, how, once again, we had fallen victim to a great prank. No one was buying. We actually got calls in the office all the next week complaining about cutting the last half of the show.

The next week I previewed the ending of the show...and they set it straight...telling everyone about the prank. Something like this could only come from the warped minds of the people at NLRH. I understand all the shows are still available on cassette and CD. Check the web and you'll find them. Great stuff!

posted by Larry Scott

 

Thursday, January 6, 2005

A MINI-REUNION

It was only three people...but we called it a KQ4 reunion, anyway.

Last month Joel "J.R." Miller, Larry Scott and Jack Malone got together for dinner. Still the same craziness after more than 30 years!

We are planning more reunions and hope to have more KQ4 staff members join in.

posted by Larry Scott

Friday, December 31, 2004

NEW GOODIES ON THE MAIN SITE

We've just added lots of new goodies to the site.

A package of 21 station IDs...with lots of "heavy" production from Jeff Clarke.

Also...many new airchex...Jeff Clarke, Gloria and Joe Collins.

Lots of spots...Music Millennium and others.

And a NBC Radio Newtwork newscast from January 1973...the Vietnam Peace Accords and LBJ's death...including spots for the 1973 Ford Torino and Alka-Seltzer.

Be sure to take your anti-flashback medication.

posted by Larry Scott



 

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